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If you watch Freeview, please read on...
 
This year will see the arrival of new 4G mobile services across the UK. These services may cause problems with your TV reception, leading to loss of sound, blocky images or loss of some or all Freeview channels. Only those who watch Freeview will be affected; you’re unlikely to experience any issues if you watch cable or satellite TV.
 
at800 is the organisation created to make sure UK viewers can still watch Freeview when 4G mobile services at 800 MHz are launched.  Community Impact Bucks working with at800 to ensure you are supported and can continue to watch Freeview.
 
Can this be fixed?
 
Yes!
 
Before 4G is switched on in your area, at800 will write to you if you might be affected.  You may also receive an at800 filter - free of charge. This connects between your TV aerial and your TV, set-top box or signal booster. The filter is smaller than a pack of cards and in most cases will enable you to continue watching Freeview as normal.
 
You may be able to fit the filter yourself.  If not, don’t worry -  at800 can help if you’re aged 75 or over, registered disabled, blind or partially sighted or have lived in a care home for 6 months or more.   A professional and CRB-checked engineer or volunteer will visit and install the filter for you free of charge.  Please contact at800 on 0333 31 31 800 to arrange this if you think you have been affected.
 
If more work is needed to restore your Freeview service this will also be carried out by at800 and you won’t need to pay.
 
Do’s and don’ts
 
Do look out for a postcard from at800
Do keep hold of your at800 filter if you are sent one. Only try to fit it if you think you can do so easily
Do call at800 on 0333 31 31 800  if you’d like help with fitting the filter or need further advice or support
Do visit www.at800.tv for more information
 

Don’t worry - at800 is here to help and will ensure you can continue to watch Freeview
Don’t buy a new TV or aerial or re-tune your TV - this won’t solve the problem
Don’t buy a filter - it’s likely you will be able to get one for free

 
Posters that can be downloaded and displayed in your area
PDF
Example Outreach A4 Poster_AW_ORPP02_HR.pdf
PDF

Bell Ringing in the Wye Valley

St Paul’s church tower.  Iconic symbol of Wooburn for almost 600 years.  Built in the mid 15th Century and now immortalised in the new village sign installed on Wooburn Green.

But the tower is not just the sight, it is also the sound of the Wye Valley through the years.  The peculiar sound of English church bell ringing continues to be practiced to the present day by a resident band of local ringers, drawn from Bourne End, Wooburn, Flackwell Heath and Loudwater, supported by visitors from the surrounding towns and villages.

The band is looking for new recruits, with first lessons due to commence in April.

You can’t have failed to notice the how the world’s attention was focused on the British Isles in 2012: The Queen’s Diamond Jubilee and the Olympic and Paralympic Games showed off the best of Britain and bells were very much a part of that.  From the specially constructed Thames Pageant barge, through Martin Creed’s “All The Bells” mass participative artwork to the giant bell rung by Bradley Wiggins at the Opening Ceremony.  “Be not afraid, the isle is full of noises” reads its inscription.

Wooburn’s church tower is home to eight ringing bells, as well as the bell that strike the hours for the hand wound Victorian turret clock.  The bells are situated in the highest part of the tower, whilst the ringers operate from a dedicated room below, level with the clock faces, which is accessed via a spiral staircase.  Look up when you enter the church and you can see the circular trapdoor through which the bells themselves can be removed for servicing, as most recently happened in 2002.

The bells range in size from a modest 75cm diameter to nearly twice that size, and four times heavier!  The bells are much too heavy to lift, but they are easy to swing, as they are hung on modern ball bearings and attached to a wheel, which is turned using a rope that descends from the belfry into the ringing chamber.  The bells are rung, in sequence, from lightest to heaviest, creating the classic descending scale of notes that we call ‘rounds’.

It is therefore good technique, not strength, that counts: A blend of rhythm, control, listening and watching; learning to ring is a little like riding a bicycle – it can take a few lessons, but we only take the stabilisers off when you’re ready to go solo!

Bell ringers come from all sorts of backgrounds – and can be almost any age.  At Wooburn we teach children from about ten years upwards and the only upper limit is being able to climb the stairs, which most ringers will tell you is the hardest part!

Ringing is excellent moderate exercise for people of all ages and all levels of fitness according to recent research carried out by YMCAfit.  It is a mentally stimulating and highly social activity with 40,000 participants of all ages across the country.

If you’re looking for a new and exciting pastime for yourself or your family this year, why not give bellringing in the Wye Valley a try?  Book now to secure your place.

To sign up for your first session, contact: John Walton 01628 531360 / je.walton@virgin.net or Val Berry 01628 525512 / berry.family@talk21.com

For more information, visit: www.bellringing.org www.stpaulswooburn.org/bells.htm

 

 

Green Man Pub demolition video by Liz & David Johncock

Having problems playing, then download the video (15M) here Right Click and "SAVE"

 

Harry Merryweather – Obituary

Harry Merryweather – The Civilian Side

When Boots wanted someone important to open their new shop they asked the shop staff and their customers “Who is the most popular person in the village?” The popular choice by a mile was – Mr Harry Merryweather.  As you can see from the photograph taken on17 November 2008, he thoroughly enjoyed being the centre of attention of a group of charming ladies.

Harry is widely recognised as the bemedalled  man who collected more than £40 000 over the years selling Poppies door to door. He was the man who wore not only his own medals from service in the 1940s but he also wore medals from his late father and brother. Wearing their medals made him feel he was representing them at the war memorial on Remembrance Sundays or when he was out selling Poppies.

But there were many others sides to Harry Merryweather. His house backs on to Fennels Wood and he was very active in Fennels Wood Conservation Group. I have a number of photos of him behind stalls to publicise and finance the FWCG and helping clear away the kind of junk that people dump in woods.

The Conservation Group did a lot of good work but what has stuck in the minds of the parents and children of the 1980s is Harry and the Teddy Bears Picnics. Children were invited to bring their Teddies for fun, games and tea in the woods. Of course not every child chose to cuddle a teddy so there was a space set aside for the “Friends of the Bears Club” where Sooty, the Wombles and other cuddlies I recognise but can no longer name could sit with their friends. Harry’s daughter, Pam Saunders, recalls that Harry had his own Teddy who lived at the bottom of his kitbag and was his mascot seeing him safe through his military service. Harry’s Teddy specialised in parachute jumping from the trees.

And Harry could write.  He had the gift of being able to tell a story on paper. I attach three of his pieces – two of them were previously in the Grapevine. “Ready, Steady, Crack” and “A Walk in the Fog” are about the days when young Harry was courting his “lovely Violet”. Seventy years later they lie together still in Little Marlow Cemetery.

Tim Kendell

Ready, Steady, Crack

I had been going out with my lovely Violet since I first came to Flackwell Heath so I thought it was time to ask mum if I could bring her home and she could sample some of your lovely pancakes. The table was set, the kitchen range stoked up, batter prepared, frying pan at the ready and number one pancake on the go. When cooked it went straight from range to plate. As mum slowly slid the pancake onto Violet’s plate there was an almighty crash as the plate split in half and the pancake sagged over the bits like a demolished tent. So much for first impressions – the unbroken plates were soon gathered up and put into the oven to warm.

Harry Merryweather

A Pig in a Pram   

During World War II and afterwards the Government urged people to keep a pig in their back gardens.  My next door neighbour in Blind Lane, Denis Cook, got some bricks although in short supply and I built him a lovely pig sty run for the intended pig.

On an overcast evening Den set off with his wife’s pram down Green Dragon Lane, Chapman Lane, Sedgmoor Road to the last house on the right in Chapel Road where Joe Weedon lived.  The pigs were kept on the allotment so off they went to select the one Den wanted. He picked the runt of the litter, hardly the size of a new born baby and there they stood chattering about the do’s and dont’s of pig management until darkness descended and it began to rain. After paying Joe it was hood up, spray cover on the pram, pig settled down nicely and the long trek in the darkness, wind and rain. He had just got to the ‘Dip’ in Chapman Lane ( where Highland Road goes in ) when a big black Wolsey car flashed past him and stopped in front.  Out jumped two policemen. “Where do you think you are going?” (A man with a pram out on a dark rainy night didn’t make sense.) One of the policemen shone his torch into the pram. The sleeping pig did not give a grunt.  “Hello. What have we here?”  “I have just bought it from Joe Weedon” replied Den.  “Where does he live?” the policeman said.  “Last house in Chapel Road on the right” said Den.  “Then we’d better make sure.”

He retraced his footsteps along Sedgmoor and Chapel Road, when they got to Joe Weedon’s the house was in darkness. A sharp rap on the knocker brought Joe in his night attire to the door. “Do you know this man with the pram?”  “Yes”, Said Joe. “ I’ve not long sold him a pig, alright?”  “ Mr Cook, you can go now.”  So the pig in the pram problem was now solved as Dennis wearily plodded home to the wife in Blind Lane who said, “Where have you been all this time?

Harry Merryweather

A Walk in the Fog

After a very pleasant evening it was time to take my lovely Violet home. It was a very foggy night and the route we took was the footpath in Green Dragon Lane, across two of Robert’s fields and one style to emerge at the kissing gate at the ‘Dip’ in Chapman Lane. We had just crossed one field and got over the style when I sensed in the gloom something was impeding our progress.  Drawing Violet to one side I said. “Mind out, darling, there is an old cow laid on our path”. We skirted it and proceeded on our way.  Yes. There were four legs but none of them bovine.  It just goes to show how any walk in the country can be interesting.

Harry Merryweather

 

 

Redevelopment Proposals for the RAF Daws Hill site

Invitation to a Public Exhibition

Redevelopment Proposals for the RAF Daws Hill site, High Wycombe
by Taylor Wimpey West London

On behalf of Taylor Wimpey West London, you are invited to attend an exhibition to discuss redevelopment proposals at the RAF Daws Hill site.
Taylor Wimpey West London is seeking public views on the nature and scale of development that should take place at this site. The details of the scheme are not fixed at this stage and so this is your opportunity to influence the proposals and provide the project team with any other relevant information that you feel should be taken on board.

PLEASE NOTE THAT THERE WILL BE NO SCHEMES PRESENTED AT THE EXHIBITION RATHER WE ARE LOOKING FOR VIEWS AND FEEDBACK ON THE CONTRAINTS WHICH WILL INFORM THE DEVELOPMENT OF THIS SITE.

Your views and opinions on what should happen at this site are essential and so we urge you to attend. The exhibition will take place over two days as follows:

Date: Thursday 1st December and Saturday 3rd December 2011
Venue: RAF Daws Hill, Daws Hill Lane, High Wycombe HP11 1PW
Time: 2.00 pm to 8.00 pm on Thursday and 10.00 am to 5.00 pm on Saturday


Members of the project team will be in attendance at the exhibition to answer questions and take a note of any comments or suggestions you may have.
We will review all comments from this exhibition and present our proposals at another exhibition in Spring 2012. The planning application will be submitted in Autumn 2012.

PDF

 

 

Report: 'Sainsbury's 'won't cause closure of Flackwell Heath

See report in The Star or on the Bucks Free Press website Link Here

 

Wycombe District Council has now received the considered comments on the future of the Green Man site from the Planning and Environment Group of the Residents Association.  It was drawn up by Group Chair, Carolyn Leonard, with assistance from Councillors, planners and concerned local people who care for this quirky village of ours.

Their submission (See below) takes account of the views of the public meeting of 24 January and presents them in the format the Planning Committee recognises.  It explains the problems that the development would cause and relates them to the policies with which planners work.

Chepping Wycombe Parish Council has also sent in a substantial submission.

Tim Kendell

Re: – THE GREEN MAN – PLANNING APPLICATION NO:- 11/05045/FUL

Dear Mrs Ion,

We wish to bring the following concerns regarding this application to your attention.

  1. The Core Strategy Policy CS10 states a centre such as Flackwell Heath should provide basic food and grocery shopping, supported by a limited range of other shops.  At the public meeting held on Monday 24th January at the Community Centre there was overwhelming support that the existing shops in Flackwell Heath provide these facilities and there was no demonstrable need for an additional store such as Sainsbury Local (Local Plan Saved Policy S1.2).  Furthermore this development if permitted will have an adverse impact on the vitality and viability of the businesses, which already exist as spending will be spread more thinly and this may force some to cease trading with the resulting loss of a greater number of jobs than may be created by the proposed development. 
    (Local Plan Saved Policies S1.3a and S1.3c)

  2. The proposed development being more bulky and longer than the existing Green Man buildings will have an adverse impact on neighbouring properties, particularly numbers 4 and 2 Straight Bit being visually intrusive.  At present the rear gardens of these two properties have an open aspect due to that of number 4 being flanked by The Green Man’s Beer Garden, should this development be allowed not only will this amenity space be lost and the gardens have a more enclosed feeling but the sun comes from the direction of The Green Man and therefore the proposed development would cause overshadowing and a consequential loss of light, particularly to the rear rooms of number 4 (Local Plan Saved Policies G8.1a and G8.1c).
    Light pollution affecting neighbouring properties is also a potential problem.  Clearly a high level of lighting during operational hours would be required and this would obviously be extended for staff convenience whilst on site.  With such a development there would also be a necessity for appropriate security lighting outside these hours.

  3. We consider there will be far greater noise disturbance over a significantly extended period for all the neighbouring properties than when The Green Man was trading.  The proposed air conditioning units will particularly affect numbers 4 and 2 Straight Bit and 23C Old Kiln Road and are likely to be a 24-hour nuisance.  Traffic noise, car doors slamming, trolley noise, servicing etc. will affect all the neighbouring properties including the flats in Libra House and noise will extend outside the proposed hours of operation for staff convenience as they will be on site at these times (Local Plan Saved Policy G8.1 d).

  4. The site is immediately opposite a bus stop, is adjacent to the junction of Common Road with Straight Bit and is approximately 50 yards from the mini roundabout by Swains Market.  Traffic flows along this section of road are already problematic particularly at rush hour and at the beginning and end of school days.  The additional impact of the traffic going into and out of the site will simply make matters worse and will increase the risk of accidents.  Moreover, we see a problem with servicing the site from Straight Bit during operational hours as we feel there will be insufficient room for the manoeuvring of large heavy goods vehicles together with shoppers’ vehicle movements, pedestrian movements, elderly folk’s buggy movements, trolley movements etc.  We note the smaller unit to the rear of the property will be serviced with 10.7m (35 foot) vehicles but there is no real indication of the size of vehicles to service the Sainsbury Local.  We fear this will prove impractical and alternative means will be sought:
    a) Out of hours servicing adding to the inconvenience of neighbouring properties
    b) On the road servicing from Straight Bit which would be dangerous and cause traffic congestion
    c) Servicing from Old Kiln Road via the pedestrian access which would cause considerable inconvenience to the residents of Old Kiln Road and would be via a narrow estate road.
    (Core Strategies CS 20.4 and CS 20.5)
    It is not clear exactly what Sainsbury’s delivery schedule and methodology would be to service the Sainsbury Local.  We feel this needs full clarification.

  5. We consider the pedestrian access to Old Kiln Road should be closed off because the car park of the proposed development, being on the main road, would be seen as more convenient by many folk than Budgens at the back in Old Kiln Road and would be used by parents taking their children to the Carrington Schools and the nursery thus blocking the car park for other users.  The closure of the access to Old Kiln Road would also prevent any servicing of the site from the rear.
    (Core Strategy CS 20.5).

  6. The developer’s Community Needs Assessment in section 5.16 states ‘the application site is well served by schools…All schools offer a variety of after school clubs and activities for pupils, including school sport’.  This assessment is flawed as they have not considered that the schools only cater for pupils up to the end of Year 6 i.e. Age 11.  There is little provision for youngsters beyond this age; indeed Wycombe District’s Community Facilities Strategy cites Flackwell Heath as not having a youth club.  This is an important omission in village facilities and its lack leads to some anti-social behaviour within the village.  The Residents’ Association has been trying to redress this problem for several years however the lack of suitable premises has prevented this.  The Community Facilities Strategy also points out the Community Centre is fully booked on a regular basis and even the Public Meeting on the 24th January could not have taken place had the regular users not been prepared to forgo their slot that evening.  With renovation The Green Man Site could provide a suitable youth facility fulfilling an identified community need (Core Strategy Policy CS 15.2a).  It could be used for youth during the evenings and additionally during the day as a library.  Library facilities are currently a subject of discussion with Bucks County Council.  Should this not be practical we feel a facility should be provided on another site within the village offering no less overall community benefit (Core Strategy Policy CS 15.2b).  We note the developer is seeking exemption from paying S106 contributions in their Design and Access Statement section 5.7 and would urge Planning Officers to resist this, as there is clearly a shortfall of community facilities in the village.

  7. It was clear from the public meeting that the site would be better used for a youth facility or for community use however if this is not viable perhaps affordable housing with part ownership to enable younger folk to stay in the village or housing for the elderly would be appropriate.

It is clear the developers have little regard for the village of Flackwell Heath and its villagers as there has been no community consultation with the two main village organisations, namely the Residents’ Association and the Community Association and we would urge you to consider our views in your deliberations.

Yours sincerely,

Carolyn Leonard
Chair of Planning and Environment Group

PDF

 

Green Man & Sainsbury, Summary of public meeting held 24th January 2011

Enterprise Inns and Oakengates One Limited have applied to Wycombe District Council for planning permission to knock down the Green Man and replace it with a building containing two retail units, open from 7am to 11pm seven days a week. The larger unit of 4000 sq ft is designated a Sainsbury Local.  There would also be 16 car parking spaces.

The “top up convenience store” will “provide a broad range of goods, and in particular, a range of fresh produce including fruit, vegetables and meat. Alongside the fresh produce the store would also provide other basic goods (dry, tinned, chilled and frozen items) and non-food products such as household products, toiletries, newspapers, magazines and tobacco.”

A public meeting called at short notice by the FH Residents Association filled the Large Hall of the Community Centre to capacity on the evening of Monday 24 January.  The purpose of the meeting was to gauge opinion and explain that for an objection to carry any weight it had to deal with a limited range of planning issues.  And to emphasise that any objections has to be with the WDC Planning by Thursday 3 February.

Vic Grewal said that Budgens had a team of property experts who would be able to list the relevant grounds for objection. He undertook to have this information available in his shop as soon as possible.

Wycombe District Council Planning has a list of matters that they take into account when they consider planning applications.

Loss of privacy
Loss of light
Car parking
Traffic generation
Noise and disturbance
Character of the area
Green belt or conservation area
Design, appearance and layout
National and local policies

Among the issues they will NOT take into account are
Loss of value to property
Commercial competition

At the meeting, a  major topic of concern was traffic. Sixteen parking spaces for staff and customers was thought to be inadequate. People were very concerned about delivery trucks backing in or out of the car park especially as they would be so close to a busy roundabout, the Carrington schools and pre-schools. 

There was concern about the risk of loosing some of our shops. Vic Grewal who has the franchise of the Budgens supermarket said that he and Budgens would have to reconsider their improvement plans and even close the shop if they had to share the customers with Sainsburys. Flackwell News was feeling the effects of the recession and they too would have to consider their position if the new shop sold newspapers, magazines and tobacco – which the application say they will do.

On 22 January Pam Mannering checked the prices of 15 widely used branded goods -  household goods such as Anchor Butter, PG tea bags and Fairy Washing-up Liquid.  The total cost of the 15 items was £28.88 in the Sainsburys Local in Marlow and £27.52 in Budgens.

There were some positive suggestions for an alternative use for the site. There was considerable applause for a suggestion that the Green Man could be converted to a youth club/centre. People also liked the idea of housing on the site.

At the end of the meeting people were asked to raise a hand if they did NOT want a Sainsbury in the village. Virtually every hand was raised.

You can see the full details of the application on the Wycombe District Council website. The application number is 11/05045/FUL. Beware! Several people reported that they had been unable to send an objection via the Council website. Don’t leave it to the last minute.

Brian Moulson who runs the village website has a new address where you can email thoughts, ideas and comments to  feedback@flackwellheath.net and he will then put it up on the website.

As Editor of the Grapevine I am concerned that there appears to be total unanimity against a new Sainsbury development in our village. Sainsbury is a perfectly respectable chain of supermarkets and it has to be impossible for the 5 000 adults in the village to all agree we do not want a Sainsbury Local in Flackwell Heath.  Would people who would welcome a please let us know via the feedback address what you think and why.

Tim Kendell

PDF

 

 

To object you must write, email to or post comments on the Wycombe District Council's Planning web site please read below before you write or comment

You can also write to your local councillor & MP all contact details are below.

Note: You must Quote Application Ref: 11/05045/FUL on any correspondence.

Contact Address Web site / Email
Wycombe District Council Planning Dept Queen Victoria Street, High Wycombe,
Bucks HP11 1BB
http://planningpa.wycombe.gov.uk
(Direct Link to Search form enter 11/05045/FUL)
Councillor R W Jennings 2 Halls Corner, Flackwell Heath, High Wycombe Bucks HP10 9BW bill_jennings@wycombe.gov.uk
Councillor J D Langley 18 Rush Burn, Wooburn Green, Bucks HP10 0BT julia_langley@wycombe.gov.uk
Councillor John A Savage 45 Chapman Lane, Flackwell Heath,
Bucks HP10 9BD
john_savage@wycombe.gov.uk
Dominic Grieve Member of Parliament for our area http://www.dominicgrieve.org.uk (Direct link to contact page)

WDC

PDF

Green Man & Sainsbury, Summary of public meeting held 24th January 2011

Enterprise Inns and Oakengates One Limited have applied to Wycombe District Council for planning permission to knock down the Green Man and replace it with a building containing two retail units, open from 7am to 11pm seven days a week. The larger unit of 4000 sq ft is designated a Sainsbury Local.  There would also be 16 car parking spaces.

The “top up convenience store” will “provide a broad range of goods, and in particular, a range of fresh produce including fruit, vegetables and meat. Alongside the fresh produce the store would also provide other basic goods (dry, tinned, chilled and frozen items) and non-food products such as household products, toiletries, newspapers, magazines and tobacco.”

A public meeting called at short notice by the FH Residents Association filled the Large Hall of the Community Centre to capacity on the evening of Monday 24 January.  The purpose of the meeting was to gauge opinion and explain that for an objection to carry any weight it had to deal with a limited range of planning issues.  And to emphasise that any objections has to be with the WDC Planning by Thursday 3 February.

Vic Grewal said that Budgens had a team of property experts who would be able to list the relevant grounds for objection. He undertook to have this information available in his shop as soon as possible.

Wycombe District Council Planning has a list of matters that they take into account when they consider planning applications.

Loss of privacy
Loss of light
Car parking
Traffic generation
Noise and disturbance
Character of the area
Green belt or conservation area
Design, appearance and layout
National and local policies

Among the issues they will NOT take into account are
Loss of value to property
Commercial competition

At the meeting, a  major topic of concern was traffic. Sixteen parking spaces for staff and customers was thought to be inadequate. People were very concerned about delivery trucks backing in or out of the car park especially as they would be so close to a busy roundabout, the Carrington schools and pre-schools. 

There was concern about the risk of loosing some of our shops. Vic Grewal who has the franchise of the Budgens supermarket said that he and Budgens would have to reconsider their improvement plans and even close the shop if they had to share the customers with Sainsburys. Flackwell News was feeling the effects of the recession and they too would have to consider their position if the new shop sold newspapers, magazines and tobacco – which the application say they will do.

On 22 January Pam Mannering checked the prices of 15 widely used branded goods -  household goods such as Anchor Butter, PG tea bags and Fairy Washing-up Liquid.  The total cost of the 15 items was £28.88 in the Sainsburys Local in Marlow and £27.52 in Budgens.

There were some positive suggestions for an alternative use for the site. There was considerable applause for a suggestion that the Green Man could be converted to a youth club/centre. People also liked the idea of housing on the site.

At the end of the meeting people were asked to raise a hand if they did NOT want a Sainsbury in the village. Virtually every hand was raised.

You can see the full details of the application on the Wycombe District Council website. The application number is 11/05045/FUL. Beware! Several people reported that they had been unable to send an objection via the Council website. Don’t leave it to the last minute.

Brian Moulson who runs the village website has a new address where you can email thoughts, ideas and comments to  feedback@flackwellheath.net and he will then put it up on the website.

As Editor of the Grapevine I am concerned that there appears to be total unanimity against a new Sainsbury development in our village. Sainsbury is a perfectly respectable chain of supermarkets and it has to be impossible for the 5 000 adults in the village to all agree we do not want a Sainsbury Local in Flackwell Heath.  Would people who would welcome a please let us know via the feedback address what you think and why.

Tim Kendell

PDF

 

 

Green Man & Sainsbury Local (Jan 2011)

Public Meeting Monday 24 January

Final dates for comments to the Planning Dept

 

Enterprise Inns and Oakengates One Limited have applied to Wycombe District Council for planning permission to knock down the Green Man and replace it with “a building containing two retail units, open from 7am to 11pm seven days a week. The larger unit of 4000 sq ft is designated a Sainsbury Local.  There would also be 16 car parking spaces.

 

The “top up convenience store” will “provide a broad range of goods, and in particular, a range of fresh produce including fruit, vegetables and meat. Alongside the fresh produce the store would also provide other basic goods (dry, tinned, chilled and frozen items) and non-food products such as household products, toiletries, newspapers, magazines and tobacco.”

 

The store will provide approximately 25 new jobs but we have no indications that anyone has attempted to estimate how many jobs may be lost by the opening of this shop. 

 

You can see the full details of the application on the Wycombe District Council website. Go to Public Access – agree to their conditions for accessing the website - quote the Application number 11/05045/FUL.

 

Public Meeting

The FH Residents’ Association is facilitating a meeting to discuss this application and how it will affect the village at 8:30pm on Monday 24 January in the Large Hall of the Community Centre. Further details as soon as available. Thanks to the FH Community Association and to the players who gave up their badminton evening to make the Hall available.

 

The last dates for WDC to receive comments are :-

for Neighbour Consultations 3 February 2011

for Standard (ie general public) Consultations 9 February 2011

 

The WDC case officer is Jenny Ions

 

Gerry Knowldon, landlord of the Cherry Tree, has opened a petition for people who object to sign.  You can sign it at the Cherry Tree and in our local shops. But please only sign once.

 

The people who decide on planning applications pay a great deal of attention to letters written by individuals. But it is a waste of time and postage for you to sign a standard letter written by someone else.

 

Please note that, as organisations, the village website, the Grapevine, the FH Residents Association and the Community Association have no opinions on this issue. Their role is to inform the community of what is going on and to and to ensure that the opinions of the people of Flackwell Heath are heard.

 

Tim Kendell                                                    Carolyn Leonard

Editor of the Grapevine                                  FH Residents’ Assn

                                                                        Planning and Environment Committee

 

PDF

 

Amersham & Wycombe College outlines plans for new Flackwell Heath campus

Building redevelopment will give students new Construction Skills Centre, Gym and enhanced facilities for a range of vocational courses


Amersham and Wycombe College has unveiled plans to redevelop its campus at Flackwell Heath, creating new college buildings and training facilities that will benefit thousands of students and the local community.
The project, which is expected to run from February to November 2011, will see an extensive refurbishment and modernisation of the existing college buildings at Flackwell Heath.  Plans for the new campus include a new gym, a flagship Construction Skills Centre for the region and reconfigured and refurbished facilities for a wide range of subjects, including Health & Social Care, Sport, Public Services, Leadership and Professional Development, English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and Foundation Studies. These outstanding facilities will be in addition to the existing commercial standard Hair and Beauty Salon facilities already onsite. The new building will also feature improved internal and external social spaces for students and greater wheelchair access.
“We are very excited about the new development and what it will bring to the local community.  The new campus has been designed to reflect the professional workplace and provide an environment that will greatly enhance the study experience for all. It will offer fantastic new learning, leisure and training facilities for employers and students,” said Gill Clipson, Principal and Chief Executive of the College.  “We believe the new campus will be a great asset to Flackwell Heath and the surrounding area.”
The Flackwell Heath refurbishment project runs alongside a major project to upgrade the library facilities at the Amersham Campus. Both projects support Amersham & Wycombe College’s continued focus on providing high quality further and higher education programmes. The College is a resource for the whole community, preparing young people for their future in higher education or work and employers looking to professionally develop their staff through CPD courses or Apprenticeships.

Prospective students can find out more about the College refurbishment and courses in an Opening Evening on January 26th, 17.30 – 20.30pm at its Amersham and Flackwell Heath Campuses.  Full information can be found on: www.amersham.ac.uk/Courses/open-evenings/

January 12, 2011

.There is an open evening on 26th January 2010 see Calendar

 

Campus 1
Campus 2
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Woodside Avenue Street Party 16th July 2010

As part of the Eden Project "Big Lunch" some of the local younger mums organised a mammoth street party and I as a keen member of the Bourne End Video Camera Club took along my camera and tripod. I have carefully edited the footage down to a 9 minute film which is above

Enjoy,

John Zammit

 

 

 

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